Conducting an Equipment Fire Risk Assessment for New Fire Suppression Equipment

The Impact of Fire Risk Assessments on Suppression System Designs

As featured in Mining Magazine.

When determining how best to protect a piece of heavy off-road equipment from the threat of fire, a Fire Risk Assessment is the most indispensable procedure one can use. This process entails an evaluation of the main hazards of a specific machine and its operating environment. The assessment provides a decision-making framework to help one evaluate a vehicle's risk potential, implement changes to mitigate those risks, and, when deemed necessary, to design and install a fire suppression system that appropriately addresses those risks. It is so helpful, the US National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) has a guide to explain and encourage its use.

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Liberty Frac Pumps with AFEX Fire Suppression Systems for the Digital Oilfield

Fire Suppression Systems Reduce Risk in Oil & Gas Industry

As published in the magazine: The American Oil & Gas Reporter

From North Dakota to Ohio to Louisiana and Texas, wherever hydraulic fracturing is being done there have been fire incidents over the years which have resulted in total surface equipment loss. The bottom line cost of such “thermal events” is generally in the tens of millions, which is to say nothing of productivity losses and any associated public relations damage done to the affected stakeholders. All things considered, adding fire suppression systems to at-risk machinery is a safe and cost effective solution to this potentially devastating problem.

A vehicle fire suppression system is a safety accessory that is mounted on a piece of machinery, such as a pump or blender, to protect it in the event of a fire. Comprised of tanks filled with fire-fighting agent, fire-detecting sensors, and a distribution network of tubes, hoses and nozzles, it is permanently affixed to the machine. In the oil & gas industry, these systems are appropriate for use on the vehicles used in hydraulic fracturing and on any diesel generators used on site.

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Telematics: When Do You Want To Know Your Machine Is On Fire? Afex control unit with alert to discharge.

Telematics: When Do You Want To Know Your Machine Is On Fire?

As published in Heavy Equipment Guide magazine.

Because fire by nature is unpredictable, proactive companies choose to invest in fire suppression systems for their fleets of mobile heavy equipment. But at any given moment it is difficult to know if these systems in the field are fully functional, ready to protect your assets. Fortunately, that is about to change. You can now have your fire suppression system’s status provided in real time on any computer, or on a smartphone for monitoring outside of the office.

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Are fire suppression systems worth the money. A dozer in a peru mine with afex fire suppression system.

Hey Grinder Guy, Are These Fire Suppression Systems Worth The Money?

As printed in the December 2013 issue of WHEN (Waste Handling Equipment News).

Fire suppression systems are becoming more and more common due to the mandates in mines, above ground and below, along with some insurance companies requiring systems on insured machinery. In addition, with the increased pressures and complexity of hydraulics and the advent of Tier IV engines and their associated excess heat, fires could potentially increase.

So for real facts, I spoke with Kenneth Daniels of AFEX Fire Suppression Systems. AFEX call themselves the heavy equipment experts because that's all they service, heavy equipment. AFEX is in most major mines in the world, have CAT® endorsed products, and their systems are engineered into some John Deere® products. Without giving me the AFEX sales pitch, he explained why I had heard complaints about fire suppression systems in the past.

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Waste Handling Equipment with Fire Suppression System

Landfill Mobile Equipment Fire Prevention and Suppression Best Practices

As printed in the February 2014 issue of Waste Advantage Magazine.

When it comes to preventing fires on the heavy equipment at landfills, the first line of defense will always be keeping machines clean and well maintained. Using compressed air to clear out the radiator and other areas that tend to gather debris is a common way to do this, and doing it frequently is the easiest way to stay ahead of a problem. This is always time well spent. After all, failure to follow this best practice can result in a build up of flammable fluids and materials, which sets the stage for a fire.

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